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Healthy Eating For Seniors Made Easy

Healthy Eating For Seniors Made Easy

Healthy Eating For Seniors Made Easy

Changing Nutritional Needs and Eating Habits

As you age your nutritional needs may change, as may your eating habits. Things such as calories consumed, your appetite and home life may be things that change over time. Other factors such as medications, medical conditions and oral health may be contributing factors as to why your diet will change.

Calories

As you age you may find that your calorie needs decrease. For various reasons, you may find it easier or harder to lose weight. If you eat more calories than you burn off, you’ll gain weight.

For example, if you’ve had a knee replacement and are less mobile than you were previously, you will find that maintaining your regular diet may lead to some weight gain. In order to maintain your weight, you need to balance your calories in versus your calories out.

Appetite

It is common to experience a loss of appetite as you age. It’s also likely your sense of taste and smell will lessen. This can turn people off from eating normally.

It is important to find food items that you enjoy eating, or using a meal replacement to boost calories. Some brands to consider are Boost or Ensure. Some seniors find it easier to eat smaller, more frequent meals during the day.

It is important to get enough calories and nutrients to maintain healthy organs, muscles and bones.

Home Life

You can imagine that your life at home influences your eating habits to a certain extent. For example, if you are cooking for one, you may be tempted to skip the cooking and order take-out. If you are accustomed to cooking for two, it can be daunting to cook just for yourself. More so, if you are just entering your retirement years and are used to having the family at home, it can be challenging to start cooking just for two. Finding some simple recipes tailored to one or two servings may be a way to approach this obstacle. We have linked to a couple of recipes for your reading (and cooking!) pleasure.

Chicken Breast and Avocado Salad

Cauliflower Rice Stir-Fry

Medications

You may need to take medications to manage chronic health conditions. Some medications can affect your appetite or sense of taste. Some can also interact with certain foods and nutritional supplements. When you start a new medication, it is extremely important you check with your doctor or pharmacist for any dietary changes that need to be made.

For example, if you’re taking the blood thinner Warfarin (also sold as Coumadin), you need to avoid grapefruit. It impairs your body’s ability to metabolize that specific medication. You also need to maintain a steady level of vitamin K, which can be consumed in leafy greens such as kale or spinach.

Medical Conditions

As you get older, you become more likely to develop chronic health problems, such as diabetes, high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and osteoporosis. To help prevent or manage these conditions, your physician may recommend some dietary changes.

For example, if you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you should eat foods that are rich in nutrients, but low in excess calories, processed sugars, and saturated and trans fats.

Some older adults with certain health conditions become sensitive to foods such as onions, peppers, dairy products, and spicy foods. People receiving chemotherapy treatment for cancer may also have a hard time finding foods that are palatable due to changes to the taste buds as a result from chemotherapy.

Oral Health

Oral health changes can impact how older adults enjoy their food. If you require dentures, you may find certain textures difficult to chew.

Maintaining proper oral hygiene is important. If food gets trapped under the denture, it can cause abscess and infection at the gum line. Some medications can also cause a condition called thrush, which is essentially a yeast-like infection that occurs in your mouth. When this happens, it can be very painful to eat solid foods.

How Can Freiheit Care Help?

Whether you are at home recovering from surgery or need just a little bit of extra help around the house, call us. We offer personalized packages that include an array of services, including meal preparation and light housekeeping. We can assist you or your loved one with cooking in your own homes, using your own ingredients, to help you cook a meal you’ll love.

Additional Information and Recipes

Alzheimer's Disease

10 Early Signs of Alzheimer’s Disease

Alzheimer's Disease

How Prevalent is Alzheimer’s?

Alzheimer’s disease is the most common form of dementia. Dementia is an overall term used to describe various brain disorders caused by physical changes in the brain.

According to the Alzheimer Society of Canada, 564,000 individuals in Canada are currently living with dementia. This number is expected to increase to 1.4 million people by 2031. Most commonly, the diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease occurs after the age of 65. It is less commonly diagnosed in one’s 40s or 50s. This is called early onset Alzheimer disease.

Whether you’re experiencing possible symptoms or are concerned for your loved ones, the following list of warning signs gives you an idea of what to look out for.

1: Memory Loss

One of the most common warning signs of Alzheimer’s disease is memory loss that disrupts your daily life. This can come in the form of forgetting where you put your keys or forgetting important dates and/or events in your calendar. If you notice this is starting to occur more frequently, give your doctor a call.

2: Trouble Planning And Solving Problems

Working with numbers may become difficult. You also may notice that it becomes difficult to follow a set plan or routine, even if you have been following it for a long time.

3: Difficulty Completing Familiar Tasks

You or your loved one may begin to experience difficulty concentrating. Daily tasks may require more critical thinking as the disease progresses. If you find yourself getting lost while driving familiar routes, it’s time to see your doctor.

4: Confusion With Time And Place

Two common symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease are losing track of dates or losing track of time. You may also notice that you or your loved ones are forgetting where they are, why they are there or how they got there.

5: Difficulties With Vision And Perception

You or a loved one may begin to have problems judging distance and determining contrast or colour when driving. This can be dangerous for not only you or your loved one, but for everyone on the road. However much you want to keep your independence, this warrants a trip to the doctor and then possibly to the Ministry of Transportation of Ontario.

6: Speech Difficulties

You may find that you begin to have difficulty finding your words when engaging in conversation. You may lose your train of thought mid-sentence, or repeat what you’ve already said over again. Some seniors with Alzheimer’s disease find that initiating a conversation is a daunting task.

7: Misplacing Items

Lost your keys again? If you find yourself misplacing common items you use every day with no recollection of where you put them, you may want to discuss this with a medical professional.

8: Impaired Decision Making

This may manifest as what seems to be “irresponsible” financial choices, such as donating large sums of money to telemarketers or door-to-door salespeople. However, in reality, these decisions are made without fully understanding the repercussions.

You or your loved ones may also become less concerned with personal hygiene. Bathing and personal care may lessen over time, and you or your loved one may become unwilling to change clothes if you forget that you put them on yesterday.

9: Withdrawing From Work Or Social Events

As symptoms begin to appear, you may notice yourself or your loved ones feeling withdrawn from activities that were once enjoyable. You may begin to pull away from work, social activities or friends due to changes that are occurring. Rather than ignoring this change, speak to someone about it as there is help available.

10: Personality And Mood Changes

Someone with Alzheimer’s disease may begin to feel confused, suspicious, paranoid or fearful. These emotions are a common reaction to the changes that are occurring. You or your loved one may also begin to feel anxious or depressed. It is important to contact your doctor if you are noticing these changes.

How Can Freiheit Care Help?

If you or your loved one has been diagnosed with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, call us at 613-518-8258. We have services that can help you thrive in your home while these changes are occurring. From light housekeeping, meal preparation and assistance with personal care, you never need to be alone. If you are a primary caregiver for someone with dementia or Alzheimer’s disease, we offer respite services so you can take a well earned break. We also offer RN Psychotherapy services to address the mental changes you may be experiencing as well.

7 Simple Home Organization Tips for Seniors

7 Simple Home Organization Tips for Seniors

Organization

Home organization makes aging in place safer and easier for yourself or your aging loved one. We’ve compiled a list of 7 simple organization tips that can make your life at home easier and more organized while you continue to live independently.

#1 Store Items at Waist Height

As you age, your mobility may lessen. In order to make your belongings more ergonomically convenient, consider storing them at waist height. You can install shelves, use filing cabinets, or place items on tables. If you don’t have to bend to pick it up, not only are you giving your back a break but you are decreasing your likelihood of losing your balance and falling forward.

#2 Keep Furniture Out Of The Walkways

Have you ever stubbed your toe on a chair and had a brief moment of “where did THAT come from!”? To avoid injury we encourage older adults to have their furniture moved out of their direct pathway.

For example, moving chairs away from doorways prevents you or others from walking into it. Equally, ensuring that tables are not in your walking space will prevent you stubbing your toes.

#3 Anchor Your Area Rugs

Just like keeping furniture out of the way reduces the risk of injury, anchoring your area rugs can prevent the corners from flipping up and causing you or your loved one to trip. Carpets, if not anchored, can also pose a slipping hazard as the grips on the bottom may not be enough to keep the rug from sliding around.

#4 Extra Lighting

Using and installing extra lighting is very important for increasing the visibility of your items and home. We recommend using floor lamps and table lamps whenever possible. The extra lighting is especially helpful for individuals who may be experiencing some vision difficulties.

Some people, especially if they awake often in the night, may find it beneficial to install a night-light in their bathroom and/or hallway. This easily lights the way to the bathroom but you don’t have to be worried about it being too bright.

#5 Install Hand Rails

Install hand rails – if you don’t have any already – to your stairs, hallways, shower/tub, or beside your toilet.

Hand rails are the best option for seniors who may feel unsteady on their feet at times. In most cases, hand-rails are drilled right into the stud of the wall, and therefore are the most sturdy option. It is important that these are installed correctly so do get a professional in.

#6 Donate Clothing That No Longer Fits

If you have clothing in your closet that you haven’t worn in a while, consider donating it. Make a rule with yourself when you go through your closet; if you haven’t worn it in the last six months, it’s time to say good-bye.

When you are looking for donation centres, consider the following:

Diabetes Canada

  • You can arrange for a free pick-up from your home, and there are donation bins located in and around Ottawa.

Ontario Federation for Cerebral Palsy

  • You can arrange for a free pick-up from your home, and there are donation bins located in and around Ottawa

St-Vincent de Paul

  • Drop off to a bin or to a store location.

Value Village

  • Drop off to their donation centre.

Mission Thrift Stores

  • Drop off to their donation centre.

#7 Organizing The Laundry Room

Laundry detergent, softener and dryer sheets, oh my!

The laundry room can get cluttered very quickly, making it difficult to navigate safely. We recommend putting a laundry hamper in the room, that way when you quickly toss clothes in as you walk by, they won’t land on the floor (thus eliminating a tripping hazard!)

We also recommend putting your heavy bottles of laundry detergent at waist height to prevent you from having to bend over to pick it up. By keeping basic body mechanics in mind, you can minimize the risk of straining your back in the laundry room!

Keep a garbage bin in the laundry room as well, so you have somewhere to throw the lint from the dryer. Remember to empty the lint trap after every load to prevent fires.

How Can Freiheit Care Help?

If organizing your home seems like a daunting task, or you are unable to do it yourself, give us a call to find out how we can help. We have customizable packages that we can build for you, ensuring that someone is available to help you organize your home when you need it. Having extra hands while organizing is especially helpful, and even more so when the staff coming in have your health and safety in mind.

Simple Tips to Promote Independence for Seniors

Simple Tips to Promote Independence for Seniors

Independence does not need to waiver as you get older. Older adults are at risk of becoming dependent on their caregiver to maintain their quality of life. As caregivers, it is our job to encourage seniors to do as much as they are capable of in order to promote their independence.

Why Should We Promote Independence?

We want to promote independence for our seniors for the following reasons:

1. It is stimulating for the older adult.

  • Independence breaks seniors out of their daily routine of having a caregiver come and care for them. It provides them the opportunity to engage with their caregiver and play a role in the care they receive.

2. It is demeaning to them for caregivers to assume that they cannot do anything for themselves for ‘x’ reason.

  • Just because an older adult may have an illness, impairment or disability does not mean they are unable to care for themselves, with assistance. The tasks they perform may need to be modified to make it easier for them to complete, but they should be able to do the bulk of the task independently.

3. It provides older adults with a sense of purpose.

  • Older adults often fall into a depression because they are unable to live their life the way they used to. By providing the senior with these small tasks, they feel as though they are in control of that aspect of their life.

Promoting vs Maintaining Independence

In order to promote independence for your senior, you first need to determine how independent they are already. Promotion of a person’s independence involves providing opportunities for them to exercise their independence. This means encouraging them to do things for themselves. Maintaining a person’s independence requires them to be independent already, and just requires the caregiver to provide tools to the senior so they can continue living as independently as possible.

What Can I Do to Promote Independence?

Interactive caregiving promotes mental, physical, social and emotional well-being. This is also considered to be a holistic approach to caregiving. The art of caregiving extends beyond task-oriented skills and includes engaging in activities that help maintain a healthy mind and body. When planning activities to engage in with your older adult, keep the elements of interactive caregiving in mind.

Research indicates that keeping seniors engaged mentally, physically, emotionally and socially enables them to enjoy a higher quality of life, retain better cognitive function, stay healthy and live independently for longer.

By caring for the whole person and not just their physical being, you are engaging in the holistic approach to caregiving. By tending to the ‘whole person’, you can promote independence for your loved one.

When assisting with tasks, try to involve the person you are caring for as much as possible, encouraging them to do all that they can safely manage. It is paramount to remain calm and patient, as it is unlikely they will be able to complete tasks at the same pace as you. When you give them time and space to complete their tasks, you are giving them the freedom to independence.

How Can Freiheit Help Promote Independence?

Have you ever heard of the saying ‘do with, not for’? That is the principle that we at Freiheit Care Inc. live up to. This principle is easily implemented when caregivers remember that there is a person in that bed, and that they are likely still capable of caring for themselves.

An example of doing with and not for can be when a loved one needs to be bathed. Our caregivers can encourage their senior to wash themselves as much as they can. This could include washing their face, washing their armpits, brushing their teeth or combing their hair.

Freiheit Care Inc. provides only premium quality care to help you or your loved one “Be Free to Live”. This means that we want to help you help yourself. We are strong believers in helping you or your loved ones be your/their best. Give us a call today at (613) 518-8258 and find out how our caregivers are qualified to promote the independence of yourself or your loved one.

Palliative Care

Palliative Care At Home

Palliative Care

What is Palliative Care?

One of the services offered by Freiheit Care Inc. is palliative care at home. Palliative care is the term that refers to the care given to individuals experiencing severe, life-limiting illness. Also known as ‘comfort measures’, palliative care aims to relieve suffering and improve the quality of life for patients and their families. Palliative care is not treating the illness, but treating the symptoms that the illness produces. For this reason, palliative care is sometimes offered in conjunction with treating the primary illness.

What Kind of Services are Provided?

• Medical care to facilitate pain and symptom management
• Personal support services (e.g. personal hygiene, dressing, toileting, assistance with light housekeeping)
• Psychological support, such as psychotherapy or bereavement services for the individual and family
• Physiotherapy, dietary planning, pharmacy support, social work & other family services
• Chaplains and other spiritual advisors

Who Can Get Palliative Care?

Anyone with a life-limiting illness qualifies for palliative care. They do not need to be at end-of-life to receive palliative care.

Individuals who may benefit from palliative care are:

• Those living with Cancer
• Individuals with Heart Disease
• Those with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS)
• Adults with Dementia/Alzheimer’s Disease
• Individuals with Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) & Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS)

What Does Palliative Care Include? (The following section is sourced from “What is Palliative Care?”)

Palliative care takes a holistic approach to addressing the many symptoms and complications to a persons’ life-limiting illness.

Physical Problems

Symptoms or side effects of disease may include:
• Pain
• Difficulty breathing (dyspnea)
• Difficulty sleeping (insomnia)
• Loss of appetite (anorexia)
• Nausea or vomiting
• Constipation or diarrhea

Treatments may include:
• Medications
• Nutritional support
• Integrative therapies (such as physical therapy, massage therapy, occupational therapy, speech therapy [for difficulty swallowing])

Psychosocial Problems

• Fear
• Anxiety
• Depression
• Caregiver support
• Failure to Cope/Failure to Thrive

Support is also provided to families at this time, as they are also experiencing these psychosocial challenges

Treatments may include:
• Psychotherapy
• Family meetings
• Support groups

Practical Matters

• Legal matters
• Financial questions/concerns
• Housekeeping
• Child-care for other children in the family

Support may include:
• Meeting with a social worker
• Referral to a financial advisor/financial counsellor
• Homemaking services

Palliative Care Options

• In-hospital palliative care
• Hospice palliative care
In-home palliative care

How Can Freiheit Assist You?

At Freiheit Care Inc. we have trained staff who are dedicated to providing premium home care services, including palliative care at home. Our companions, personal support workers and nurses are all overseen by our Director of Nursing and are supported in the care they provide to you at home.

Freiheit Care Inc. will work with your physicians and primary care team to ensure we are providing you with the most relevant care. Our range of services offered ensures that we can provide you with the best care possible, at whatever point you are in your palliative efforts. Call us at (613) 518-8258 to speak with our Intake Specialist and RN to set up your in-home assessment, so we can assess your needs and plan the necessary care provisions accordingly.

Additional Resources

What is cerebral palsy?

Cerebral Palsy

What is cerebral palsy?

What is Cerebral Palsy?

Cerebral Palsy is a group of disorders that affects muscle tone, posture and balance. It is the most common childhood disorder.

According to the Centre for Disease Control (CDC), cerebral palsy affects 1 in 323 children.
It is more prevalent in boys than in girls.

There are three types of Cerebral Palsy:

• Spastic Cerebral Palsy: causes muscle stiffness and makes movement difficult
• Dyskinetic Cerebral Palsy: causes uncontrollable movement
• Ataxic Cerebral Palsy: causes problems with balance and depth perception

What Causes Cerebral Palsy?

The cause of cerebral palsy is not always known. However, there are some known causes that seem to be common in the diagnosis of cerebral palsy:

• Infections during pregnancy that affects the foetus’ neuro-development
• Stroke while in the womb or after birth
• Genetic disorders

Cerebral palsy can develop later in childhood due to childhood trauma, for example:

• Lead poisoning
• Bacterial meningitis
• Car accident resulting in traumatic brain injury
• Shaken baby syndrome resulting in traumatic brain injury

Like many other childhood illness, your child being diagnosed with cerebral palsy is not your fault. Because the causes are mostly unknown, cerebral palsy is unable to be prevented.

When to See a Physician?

The following symptoms or manifestations of cerebral palsy should be assessed by a physician as soon as possible after the child presents the following:

• Developmental delays (such as not reaching for toys by four months, not sitting up by seven months)
• Problems with motor skills (inability/difficulty walking, crawling or moving the arms and legs)
• Uncoordinated movements
• Muscle tone that is too tight (stiff) or too loose

Difficulties with Cerebral Palsy

There are a range of physical and cognitive impairments that are evident in people with cerebral palsy. Each person is different, and their manifestations depend highly on what part of the brain was affected, to what degree, and what kind of cerebral palsy they have. In general, cerebral palsy can cause the following:

• Visual impairment or blindness
• Hearing loss or deafness
• Gastroesophageal reflux (excessive spitting up)
• Tooth decay
• Learning disabilities
• Sleep disorders
• Behavioural problems
• Seizures

How is Cerebral Palsy Treated?

There are no cures for cerebral palsy, but targeted treatment is available for the different deficits that may arise in persons with cerebral palsy.

Physiotherapy
• Massage therapy
• Speech-Language therapy
• Occupational therapy
Assistance with activities of daily living
Medications (for pain, muscle spasms, gastrointestinal problems)
• Surgery (to correct physiological impairments, such as scoliosis [if developed])

How Can Freiheit Care Help?

Cerebral palsy is diagnosed in childhood, however Freiheit Care Inc. can support adults living with cerebral palsy as well.

We have a range of services that can provide additional support for you or your child in your home. Personal support workers are available to assist with various activities of daily living, such as bathing, toileting, dressing, feeding, meal preparation and light housekeeping. We have nurses on staff who can be utilized to provide at-home therapies, such as medication management and physiotherapy exercises (only if prescribed by a physiotherapist).

Call us at (613) 518-8258 to consult with our Intake Specialist and find out how Freiheit Care Inc. can support you and your child.

Additional Resources

Head Lice

Head Lice

Head Lice

If you have school-aged children, there is a good chance that you will experience the dreaded “there has been a lice outbreak at your child’s school” letter your child is destined to come home with. There are a lot of misconceptions about head lice, and we’re here to share our knowledge with you.

What are Head Lice

Scientifically known as ‘Pediculus humanus capitis’, head lice are very small greyish-brown insects that live on the human scalp. They and their eggs are very small, and are difficult to see. The eggs take 9-10 days to hatch, sticking to strands of hair close to the scalp.

Who Can Get Head Lice?

Anyone with hair is susceptible to getting head lice. You do not have to have poor hygiene to get lice. It is a common myth that head lice jump from head to head. Head lice do not have wings, and cannot jump or fly from one person to another. Another common myth is that those living in poverty are more likely to get head lice. Head lice can affect the rich, the poor and the middle class.

How are Head Lice Transmitted?

If the head lice cannot jump or fly, how is it transmitted? Good question! Head to head contact is the most common way to transmit head lice, or directly sharing items that has been in contact with someone who has head lice (items such as scarves, hats, pillows, stuffed animals).

Treatment Options

It is incredibly important not to treat anyone for head lice unless live lice are found. When someone in your household has head lice, each member of the family should be checked. There are various treatment options for someone with head lice:

Insecticides

There are currently two Health Canada approved insecticides for treating head lice

  • Pyrethrin*
  • Permethrin*

*These products are safe on humans over the age of 2 months old.

Non-Insecticides

  • Isopropyl Myristate/Cyclomethicone**
  • Silicone Oil Dimeticon***
  • Benzyl Alcohol Lotion 5%

**Only for use in children age 2 and over.
***Only for use in children age 4 and over.

Should I Keep My Child Home From School?

It is unnecessary to keep your child home from school. As long as they are being treated for lice, they are able to attend school and other activities as usual. Unless the school as a ‘no lice’ or ‘no-nit’ policy treat your children with one of the methods above and send them to the bus stop as normal.

Preventing Head Lice

Teach your child to avoid head-to-head contact with other people. Also teach them not to share items that come into contact with hair, such as hair brushes, hats or hair accessories.

Keeping Others Lice Free

If you or your child are receiving home care services, either from Freiheit Care Inc. or another organization, please inform them that your child has head lice. This allows the company to ensure they will be cautious when coming into contact with your or your child’s hair.

When to See Your Health Care Provider?

Contact your health care provider if treatment is unsuccessful, or the lice are frequently recurring. If you are unsure of what treatment is best suited for you, or if your child is younger than four years old, please contact your health care provider for advice. Some treatments are not suitable for young children.

Additional information:
https://www.caringforkids.cps.ca/handouts/head_lice
https://www.healthlinkbc.ca/healthlinkbc-files/head-lice

Supporting children with autism

What is Autism

Supporting children with autism

What is Autism?

Autism, or more formally known as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), refers to a broad range of conditions characterized by challenges with social skills, repetitive behaviours, speech and nonverbal communication. Autism affects 1 in 68 children in Canada yearly. It is most commonly diagnosed between the ages of 2 and 3 (24-36 months).

What is the Spectrum?

The term “spectrum” refers to a scale of severity or developmental impairment. In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association merged four individual diagnoses into one umbrella diagnoses, known as Autism:

  • Autism / Classic Autism / High Functioning Autism
  • Disintegrative Childhood Disorder
  • Asperger’s Syndrome
  • Pervasive Developmental Disorder

Children and adults with ASD usually have some characteristics in common, but the condition covers a wide spectrum, with individual differences in:

  • Number and particular kinds of symptoms
  • Severity: mild to severe
  • Age of onset
  • Levels of functioning
  • Challenges with social interaction

There is no “one” treatment. Because every person is different, treatment is specific per individual. Individuals with autism vary in their skills, needs and abilities. The treatment is often decided based on these factors.

Understanding the Early Signs of Autism

Early Signs of Autism (12 to 24 Months):

  • Often begins to develop speaking ability then loses it, or there is no language development
  • May appear deaf, respond unevenly or not at all to sounds
  • Difficulty consoling during bouts of crying & hysterics
  • Difficulty sleeping / wakes at night
  • Does not “point and look”
  • Failure to bond to parents, siblings and/or others
  • Self-restricted diet (“picky eaters”)
  • Limited to no imaginative play
  • Not interested in playing with other children
  • Chronic gastrointestinal problems

Please note that a child may demonstrate only a few of these symptoms, or possibly none at all until 24+ months.

If your child has ‘normal’ development but then regresses, speak to your pediatrician or family physician immediately:

Possible signs at any age are as follows:

  • Struggles with understanding other people’s feelings
  • Avoids eye contact and prefers to be alone
  • Remains nonverbal or has delayed language development
  • Repeats words or phrases over and over
  • Gets upset by minor changes in routine or surroundings
  • Has highly restricted interests
  • Performs repetitive behaviors such as flapping, rocking or spinning
  • Has unusual and intense reactions to some or all sounds, smells, tastes, textures, lights and/or colours

Please see this checklist of developmental milestones based on child’s age.

Treatment Options*

  • Play Therapy
    • Floor-time
    • Integrated Play Groups
  • Occupational Therapy
  • Speech Therapy
  • Applied Behaviour Analysis

*This is not a comprehensive list, treatment options vary for each individual.

Services for You and Your Child

At Freiheit Care, we are honoured that we are able to offer services to the younger population. Our respite care services are designed for family caregivers when they need to tend to their own personal lives or take a well earned break. We have trained staff to provide care for your child, so you don’t have to worry when you are not around!

Call us TODAY at (613) 518-8258 for your FREE phone consultation and learn about how Freiheit Care Inc. can give your child the freedom to a childhood!

Additional Resources:
https://autismcanada.org
https://www.autismspeaks.ca
https://www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/actearly/pdf/checklists/all_checklists.pdf
http://www.children.gov.on.ca/htdocs/English/specialneeds/autism/ontario-autism-program.aspx#families

 

Caring for children with disabilities

Introducing Pediatric Services at Freiheit Care Inc

Caring for children with disabilities
Written by: Jessica Moreau RN

At Freiheit Care, we are pleased to offer premium home care services that we provide to the senior population. But, did you know that we also care for pediatric customers as well?

At Freiheit Care, we provide premium, compassionate, skilled care for our pediatric customers. We value your child’s well-being and strive to complement the care they receive from family caregivers. Our young customers receive the dedicated care and attention of quality staff. We employ companions, personal support workers and nursing staff to be equipped to provide the care you and your family needs.

Every family has its unique structure and schedule, and our pediatric services at Freiheit Care are designed to be flexible to suit the needs of your child and family. We offer a 24-hour cancellation policy, flexible scheduling and premium care delivery, 24-7-365.

Our comprehensive list of services and our customizable care plans mean that your child receives the care they need, on your terms.

Services provided:

– Companionship

– Respite Care

– Palliative Care

– Rehabilitation Care

– Psychotherapy

– Personal Care

Give us a call today at (613) 518-8258 for your FREE phone consultation, and see how Freiheit Care gives you and your family the power to Be Free to Live.

Polypharmacy

What is “Polypharmacy”?

What is "Polypharmacy"?

Written by: Jessica Moreau RN

Polypharmacy, defined as the simultaneous use of medications to treat the same ailment, is plaguing our older adult population. It is estimated that 30-40% of seniors take 5 or more medications. When it comes to complex illnesses, such as cancer, heart disease and hypertension, it is common that multiple medications are used to manage symptoms.

A contributing factor to polypharmacy is that patients are often seeing multiple physicans, such as visiting their primary physician, specialists and occasionally a physician in urgent care or the emergency department.

One of the main risks of polypharmacy is drug to drug interactions. If an adverse effect occurs, it can be very difficult to figure out which of the many drugs is the cause, and the correct treatment for the adverse effect. Harmful effects of taking multiple medicines can include:

  • Falls and fractures (due to dizziness/grogginess)
  • Memory problems
  • Hospitalization
  • Higher risk of death

Multiple medications increase the risks of inappropriate medication use, non-adherence, and adverse effects. Another unwanted effect could be that physicians may hesitate to prescribe a new essential medication to a patient already on five or more. Thus, ironically, polypharmacy can lead to under-treatment. Regular medication reviews should happen to ensure that a patient is only taking what is needed. Here are some helpful questions to ask a doctor or pharmacist:

  • Do I still need to take all of my medicines?
  • Are all my medicines still helping me to stay well?
  • Could any of my medicines be causing ________?
  • Could any of my medicines be affecting the others?
  • Is there anything I can stop taking safely?

Deprescribing is what occurs when a medical professional reviews the medication list of a patient and begins discontinuing medications. It involves patients, their family and/or caregiver, doctors and pharmacists who together:

  1. Review all medicines a person is taking and why
  2. Identify how likely each medicine will cause problems
  3. Identify if each medicine is still right for the person or could be stopped
  4. If medicines can be stopped, prioritize which should be stopped first
  5. Agree on a management plan
  6. Stop medicines carefully, one by one
  7. Meet frequently to see if the plan works or the patient is experiencing problems.

Polypharmacy puts seniors living alone at risk for various problems, but knowing your medications and consulting with your health care team is paramount to keeping yourself or your loved ones safe.

About the author:
Jessica is a Registered Nurse and Intake Specialist at Freiheit Care Inc. She has been with Freiheit Care Inc since its inception. She has experience in community nursing and palliative care. Jess sees customers for initial intake assessments.